Recent Insights

What Kids are Reading

NEW RELEASE!

What Kids Are Reading, 2016

November 10 • 2015

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The state of STEM reading

The state of STEM reading

December 31 • 2015

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Most distinctive book by state

Most distinctive book by state, 2016

January 4 • 2016

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What Students Know

Teacher
I work with elementary age students who are struggling in reading. How much growth do they need before they are likely to score proficient on our state assessment in grade 3?
Achievement gaps are one of the most vexing problems faced by educators. This tool provides sample student data by subject, grade, and achievement level, to help you understand performance disparities and the amount of growth different types of students typically experience. You can also explore how much growth is required to help students catch up to or keep up with proficiency benchmarks.

Growth & Achievement

Growth & Achievement

The Growth and Achievement tool presents achievement scores for sample students along with a prism depicting possible future growth trajectories. The backdrop indicates how these scores relate to state proficiency categories.

What Students Like

Teacher
I need to encourage my middle school students to read more nonfiction. What nonfiction books are popular at that age group in my state?
Reading is like any other skill— to become good at it, you need to practice it. Helping students find books that will whet their reading appetites is a key challenge to encouraging reading practice. The annual What Kids Are Reading survey puts data into the hands of educators, parents, and students who want to learn more about what other students in the same grades, states, and so forth, like to read.

What Kids Are Reading

How Students Learn

Teacher
I am teaching fifth graders who excel at math. How can I find skills at their level to enrich their knowledge of geometry?
When teachers know what students are ready to learn next—including which skills to reinforce and which skills may need further work—they can individualize instruction for students at any skill level and teach with precision. Whether planning curriculum for a whole school year, or helping an individual student tackle a new skill, educators use the Learning Progression to view the steps students must accomplish on their way to proficiency in reading or math.

Learning Progression

The Learning Progression is a resource for educators to use in charting all students’ individual paths to proficiency in reading and mathematics, no matter their starting point. The teacher in this scenario is searching for skills to enhance his high-achieving students’ depth of exposure to geometry.